Need a jump start?

What would it be worth to you to find the things you need when you need them, instead of wasting time every day?

Spending just two hours with me will continue to pay off as you make the simple practices I show you part of your life. This session costs only $175 and I guarantee it will overcome your significant organizing issues and give you exactly the solutions you need.

Okay, I’m trying out a theory here.

I believe many people who would really love to get some organizing help are reluctant to reach out because they’re worried it will take a long time and cost a lot.

I won’t lie, sometimes they are right.

But sometimes what people really need is just a jump start.

 

So, I am now offering jump start sessions. They are shorter than my regular sessions and are priced to give you the maximum value.

You will:

  • get hands-on help with the area of your choice,
  • learn the best techniques and tricks to get organized and stay that way,
  • receive a game plan of what to do next and how to maintain your shiny new organized space.

Examples of areas you can choose: desk, closet, pantry, bathroom. If you have another idea, run it by me! I can’t promise we will finish, but I can guarantee that you will end up waaaay more organized than you are now.

You also get free weekly check-in messages to help you stay on track. Staying organized means developing good new habits, such as remembering to do what you learned. The messages are designed to remind you and keep you inspired.

Let’s get those jumper cables out! Contact me to get your jump.

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Latest Blog Posts

Cute Fruit Storage

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Originally posted 2008-08-13 10:21:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

I guess I've got fruit on the brain. I came across this striking fruit holder on Declutter It! My first thought was that it looks like a toilet seat. But now I think it looks kind of like a life preserver. It's certainly unusual and would be a definite conversation piece.

Fruit ring
If your kitchen's horizontal spaces are full, this would be a great thing to have since it uses wall space (although I'm not clear on whether you can actually buy one or it's just a design). I suppose you could use it for other round-ish foods like onions or potatoes. Or put it in the bedroom and use it for balled up socks. Or in the bathroom for soap (that's a lot of soap, though).

Snail Mail 101

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Originally posted 2011-06-20 17:24:42. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Ah, the plague of the daily mail. Kind of like death and taxes, it’s inevitable. Here’s what’s in your mailbox: stuff to

  • delegate
  • read
  • act on
  • file
  • trash

Let’s call it DRAFT for short.

Delegate
This is mail that you can fob off on someone else. If you’re married, you may decide one partner is responsible for paying the bills, so they go in that person’s in box (don’t have an inbox? Get one). Similarly, one of you may be responsible for social engagements and medical appointments.

If you have a business partner but not an office manager, divide up responsibilities. This really helps things not fall through the cracks. Especially things involving money.

Everyone needs an in box.

As above, each partner needs an inbox. When the question of “where did you put that ________?” the answer is always “In your in box.” Not “on your chair.” Not “somewhere on your desk.”

Read
Reading material includes magazines, newspapers, annual reports, tip sheets from the garden center and professional association bulletins. Keep it near where you read. Don’t read? Then stop subscribing to things.

If you don’t know where your “to reads” are, you can’t read them. Pick a spot, like a basket near your bed or a shelf in your living room, to stash it.

Don’t pick too many spots. You want to know where things are and you also need a reality check about how much there is to read. When it’s all in one place, you can clearly see that it’s not humanly possible to read all that stuff.

The rule is that when the basket or shelf is full, you have to get rid of the older publications. Grab a handful from the bottom of the stack and recycle them. Just do it. I know they have fascinating and important information in them, but you don’t have time to read them and keep up with what came in today.

Information is only useful when you can get at it.

An article buried in a months-old magazine is not accessible to you and therefore irrelevant. Just having all that information is not the same as being able to use it. If you can’t use it, it’s just like not having it at all.

Act On
This category includes bills, medical forms to file, an insurance or telephone plan to compare with what you have now, information about a product you intend to buy and a list of activities put on by a group you belong to. Put in your in box anything that requires you to take some action, whether it’s filling out a form, making a call or adding activities to your calendar.

Avoid decisions you don’t really need to make.

Do you really need to get a better phone plan, or would it just be a nice idea to know what’s out there? If it’s the second one, when are you going to take the time to compare plans?

File
Be careful about filing too much. Most people’s file cabinets are neglected paper graveyards. Paper goes in and promptly gets forgotten about and never looked at again.

Things you are keeping that you don’t need to:

  • receipts that are not for tax purposes or under-warranty purchases
  • ATM slips
  • old catalogs
  • paid bills*
  • manuals and documentation for stuff you no longer own; electric toothbrush, car, medical insurance plan

Keep files you refer to near your desk. Get a tray to store file-ables until you’re ready to file them. Files you need to maintain for legal reasons (tax returns, legal documents) are archives and should be kept in a less accessible spot, like the attic or the top shelf in the closet.

Trash
A lot of your mail shouldn’t even come into the house. Your first pass at mail sorting is to weed out the junk mail and recycle or shred it. No brainer recycling: product and service solicitations you’re not interested in, announcements for things you don’t care about, invitations from groups you aren’t joining.

To cut down on unwanted mail, register with the Direct Marketing Association (you can stop junk email here too). Get off catalog lists here.

Whether you shred or not is up to you. Some people don’t want to toss out magazines with their address labels on them. The rule of thumb is to shred anything with personal information such as account numbers, medical and employment info, ATM slips and travel itineraries. Also shred credit card applications.

Shred every day.

It’s boring and tedious and if you let it pile up, you’ll put it off forever (unless you have a six year old; they love to make a racket with the shredder). Also, if you only shred a few things a day, you won’t jam or overheat the thing.

Start Today
Don’t worry about last week’s mail. It’s getting older by the second and, unless it’s a bill, it doesn’t need your immediate attention. Develop your new mail system with today’s mail and you’ll keep on top of things.

Quick Start

  1. Get an inbox
  2. Designate a reading stash spot
  3. Have a tray for to-be-filed documents
  4. Sort your mail over the recycling bin
  5. Shred as you go
  6. Sign up for electronic bills and statements
  7. Get off junk mail lists

*I heartily recommend receiving and paying bills online. You can download PDF copies and keep them on your computer. Pay them through the biller’s website or your bank’s website; both services are generally free. Go even further and sign up for automatic monthly payments for your bills. Then you don’t have to deal with the bill at all.