Podcast 100: Completion

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This is podcast 100! Wheee! Today I’m going to talk about completion. Some of my podcasts are about concrete actions you can take to get more organized or use your time better. A lot of them are about the concepts that underlie these actions.

I never like doing something unless I know WHY I should do it. So I won’t ask you to do anything without explaining why. When you understand the why AND you agree that it’s a good idea, following through with action is usually much easier. Of course, we all still have our irrational resistance to things, and we act against our own best interests. Such is being human.

Your best self knows what to do and why, however. Take time to find that voice and listen to it instead of acting impulsively. It takes practice.

Okay, what’s so important about completion? Completion is what stops clutter, mental and physical, from happening. Completion means that you begin a task, you finish it, and then you do the third step to complete it, which is to set everything up so whatever is next can easily occur. I know, that’s a little abstract. Here are some examples.

Shopping. You need to buy things, you go out and you buy them (or order online, doesn’t matter). They arrive. Great. Now they’re on your dining table. Maybe you’ve taken them out of the boxes and bags. Good work. A lot of people stop there.

The purchasing is done, you got the stuff. The hard part is over and now you can go do something else. You’ll take care of putting stuff away later. Right? Not really. This step is deceptively difficult because it involves decision making.

The completion step is getting those purchases to their next destination; the fridge, your closet, your handbag, etc. It sounds simple, but it’s common to omit this part. When you do omit it, you have clutter on your table. Yes, a newly purchased item is clutter on your table if it’s not in the place where you will use it.

I hope you can hear the emphasis in my voice on those last five words. Things you own need to be where you will use them, or stored in their own specific place.

In my experience, people find it hard to put things away. They optimistically put this off, thinking it will take a few minutes, sometime later. But when pressed, they realize that they haven’t put things away because they don’t know where they go. In podcasts 15, 25 and 61, among others, I talk about figuring out where to put things. It’s one of those very simple, yet essential, skills you need to prevent and fix clutter.

Completion extends to tasks like setting up that new phone so you CAN use it, and trying out the new tray tables you bought to make sure they work and you don’t need to return them. That’s for new stuff coming in.

Completion is necessary for any actions you do. Here’s an example. One of my clients complained that although her husband was happy to do the family laundry and she appreciated it, he ended his task with the clean laundry folded neatly in the hamper sitting on top of the dryer. What’s wrong with that picture?

The problem was that now my client had to go through all the clothes; hers, her husband’s and the two kids’; and put them all away where they belonged. Hubby wasn’t doing the completion step, which is putting each item in the spot where it will be used, the appropriate closet or dresser.

Besides not knowing where things go, people tend to resist completion because they think it will take a long time. Putting away a family’s laundry can be time consuming, that’s true. It will save time, though, when you need to get dressed and aren’t rooting through the hamper, or even the dirty clothes, to find what you need.

This is why I keep preaching that you should make putting stuff away as easy as possible. Imagine this scenario. You come home, set your purse on a chair, hang your jacket on a nearby doorknob, kick your shoes off under a table, set your keys down, well, somewhere. We’ll worry about that later.

You pull the ice cream out of one of your bags and put it in the freezer. There! Done! You open the shoe box and realize you need to get inserts before you can wear the shoes. The shoes go back in the box, but the tissue paper gets balled up next to it.

You push those aside to look at the magazine you bought. Ad cards come tumbling out. You gather them and stack them near the shoe box. Next you glance through the mail you’ve brought in. It’s a mix of bills, announcements, mystery items and junk. Too much to think about. You put the stack near the shoe box.

Ooof! That was tiring! Time to sit down for a bit. You look around and see purse, jacket and shoes cluttering up the living room, and mail and shopping bags and boxes and random paper filling up the kitchen counter. No wonder you’re tired.

If this is you, go back through the scenario and see where completion needs to occur. The jacket goes in the closet or on a coat rack. The purse goes on the entry hall table, along with your keys. Your shoes go into a rack in the hall or in your clothes closet. Everything has a spot that is fairly easy to get to.

The ice cream is stored, so that’s done. For the shoes, make a note on your to do list to get inserts, then put the box in your closet. They don’t need to stay out as reminders as long as the task is on your list. Put the magazine in the living room or your bedside table; wherever you’ve decided to keep reading material.

Put the mail on your desk or household command center, wherever that is. Even if you don’t get to it for a few days, it will be in a place you can find it again and not cluttering up the counter. Finally, collect all the trash and recyclable paper and put it where it belongs.

Ta da! Now you can take a load off and really relax. It may seem like a lot of piddly little to do’s, but this kind of completion doesn’t take much time, and it will save you from physical and mental clutter.

What you can do right now: look around you for things that are out of place that you know how to put away. Spend a minute or two and just do it.